Review: Red Clover by Florence Osmund


RedClover

five-stars

Read from July 01 to 03, 2015 — I own a copy

Synopsis: Imagine feeling like an outsider. Now imagine feeling like an outsider in your own family.

The troubled son of a callous father and socialite mother determines his own meaning of success after learning shocking family secrets that cause him to rethink who he is and where heʼs going. In Lee Winekoop’s reinvention of himself he discovers that lifeʾs bitter circumstances can actually give rise to meaningful consequences.

Bookish Things: 248 pages. The cover is lovely.

Where to buy: Amazon on kindle for $2.86 or paperback for $12.50

My Review: 

I loved this book!

For a book to focus so intently upon the personal struggle and growth of the main character, one could be forgiven for thinking it’d be boring. But Red Clover is anything but.

Florence’s writing lures the reader into its murky depths with a siren song of beautifully engaging prose, fully formed and believable characters, and a twisting plot. She wraps it up in a way akin to the tender loving care of a mother with a new born babe.

Red Clover encourages the reader to firstly lose themselves, and then find themselves again. A little wiser and perhaps a little more whole for having experienced Lee’s story.

Witness the complex social rules and run the family gamut of the high-class Winekoop’s and experience the feeling of isolation, lack of belonging and crippling social anxiety issues Lee faces from his early years right throughout his life.

Engaging too is the twisting plot. The way new truths are discovered, unearthed and thrust upon the characters, it leaves the reader guessing as to how things will work out. Some twists are more obvious than others, but their guess-ability lends itself to drawing the reader in rather than boot them out.

Lee is a likeable character, he grows with the reader, and the gaggle of supporting cast is just as likeable. Florence caters to all tastes. Be they kooky, rough, highbrow or anything in between. You’re sure to find a character to like.

This story encourages the reader to look at themselves and check to see if they’re whole, or merely existing to please others. It lends its strength to the reader too in a way I can’t do justice to in this review. It’s just something you have to experience for yourself. 5 stars.

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Review: Revolution Earth by Lambert Nagle


RevolutionEarth

3 stars

Read from June 04 to 15, 2015 — I own a copy

Synopsis: A sunny London lunchtime is punctuated by a casual act of violence that will ricochet across four continents.

Stephen Connor, trainee Metropolitan Police detective is first on the scene when a cyclist is killed in a seemingly ordinary hit-and-run.

Just another tragedy on a London street?

Nothing seems to trouble the driver, Big Oil PR guru Greg Palmer – who treats the incident as a minor inconvenience. Palmer is confronted by the dead girl’s soulmate, Cara who howls at the injustice of a system that allows an unrepentent killer to walk free.

When Cara flees halfway across the world to confront him, Stephen is one step behind.

Can Stephen protect Cara from a group of charismatic eco-terrorists, who try to lure her in?

Palmer thrives on burying bad news and there is no dirtier business than an oil company trying to hide a major environmental disaster.

As a publicity stunt at a major oil refinery goes wrong, who will be there when Cara finds out that the target she cared so passionately about had simply moved?

Against a backdrop of London, New Zealand, Antarctica and Australia, the race begins… Continue reading

Review: Stone and a Hard Place


StoneAndAHardPlace

ReviewStars-4

Read from May 18 to 21, 2015

Synopsis: SAFE AS HOUSES
It’s hard enough for Alastair Stone to keep his two lives—powerful mage and mundane Occult Studies professor—separate without an old friend asking him to take on a new apprentice. Especially after a university colleague wants him to investigate a massive old house for things that go bump in the night. Still, Stone figures it’s an easy job: just turn up, put on a little show, and announce that the house is clean.

Only it isn’t. A malevolent spirit is reawakening in the basement, imprisoned between dimensions and intent on escape. If it succeeds, countless people will die. Worse, a trio of dark mages want to help it break free so they can control it for their own sinister purposes. They’ll do whatever it takes—including seducing Stone’s young apprentice and using him against his master—to get what they’re after.

With time running out, Stone has to stay alive long enough to uncover the spirit’s secrets. But even if he does, he fears that his own power won’t be enough to send it back. Continue reading

Review: Playing Charlie Cool


PlayingCharlieCool

ReviewStars-4
Recommended for: Sweet M/M romance lovers
Read from March 22 to 28, 2015 — I own a copy, read count: 1

Synopsis: Television producer Charlie Trager knows he’s lucky to have a successful career and good friends and family who support him. The man he loves, however, is not so lucky. Joshua Goldberg suffers the spite of an ex-wife gunning to keep him from their two children…and maybe Charlie. Determined not to let Joshua go, Charlie crafts a scheme that could remove the obstacles to their relationship…or destroy their love forever. (Note: May be read as a stand-alone story.)

Bookish Things: 250 pages. The cover is clean and very relevant. I think it works well. This is book # 3 in the Trager Family Secrets Series, but it can be read as a stand-alone book. Continue reading