AWW2017 Review: A Piece of Time


APieceofTime

ReviewStars-4

Synopsis: A fabulously spooky ghost story from Traci Harding.

Bookish Things: 21 pages. The cover is simple, but keeps in line with Traci’s other short story covers.

Where to buy: Amazon on kindle for $3.02.

My Review: 

This!

This is how a short story should be done. The story felt whole, the characters real and the conclusion satisfactory yet still ambiguous enough to leave questions.

Tani, our protagonist, made logical choices and decisions, even while dealing with the paranormal phenomenon in the story. It was so nice to see that logical thought pattern.

That the piece also focused on a pocket watch and tied it in so nicely, was an added bonus.

I saw no errors in this piece. An enjoyable read with a great cast of characters.

April 2017 Round Up: General Fiction


This is another fantastic, and informative Round Up by Christine. Check out the General Fiction Round Up for April below:

In April we had 94 reviews of 76 books by 72 authors. I cannot help but notice an interesting contrast – while Lisa Ireland received four reviews for one of her books, Liane Moriarty received four reviews for four of her books. Clearly, author popularity can be measured in many different ways. Equally fascinating is…

via April 2017 Round Up: General Fiction — Australian Women Writers Challenge Blog

Review: Aurealis #78


aurealis78

3 stars

Read from December 19 to 23, 2016 — I own a copy , read count: 1

Synopsis: Now in its 25th year, Aurealis keeps up its tradition of bringing you the finest in Fantasy and Science Fiction. Issue #78 has the bracing neo-noir ‘Enfolded’, from J Michael Melican and the punchy ‘Discarded Pieces’ from David Coleman. Terry Wood brings us visions of the future in the first part of his History of the Flying Car, and, as always, Aurealis brings you the best in reviews. Aurealis, when only the best will do.

Bookish Things: I love this cover!

Where to buy: The Aurealis website or Smashwords for $2.99.

My Review: 

This edition of Aurealis sees the neo-noir ‘Enfolded’, from J Michael Melican and the punchy ‘Discarded Pieces’ from David Coleman making a splash.

I enjoyed both stories, but Enfolded was something extremely unique. I would have liked to learn more about the characters past, which was hinted at, and know what the future held for him. A truely interesting piece that outshone the other piece easily.

Having said that, though, both pieces are well written and formed part of a nice edition, including some advise for self-publishing and promotion as well as a handful of reviews on books.

I really liked the cover art of this edition.

AWW2016 review: Assassin by Tara Moss


assassin

ReviewStars-4

Read from May 08 to 12, 2016

Synopsis: Former model turned forensic psychologist and PI Mak Vanderwall is missing, presumed dead in Paris. By hiring a hit man to kill her, the powerful and corrupt Cavanagh family aimed to silence her for good. But after narrowly escaping death, Mak has taken over her would-be killer’s world. She is very much alive. And transformed …

Back in Sydney Mak’s former flame, criminal profiler Andy Flynn is on the trail of a vicious rapist and murderer with possible ties to the infamous ‘Stiletto Killer’. He may have struck before and will certainly do so again. And while Andy struggles to cope in a world without Mak, little does he realise she is on her way back. And this time she’s ready to make her own justice. Continue reading

AWW 2016 Review: The Orchid Nursery


theorchidnursery

five-stars

Read from April 25 to 29, 2016

Synopsis: The Fifteens of Stone House have reached Attainment: the day a girlie may Beseech for the privilege of serving as a Perfected womanidol in the Orchid Nursery. When vivacious, irreverent Pearl goes missing, pious Mica hopes fervently that her friend has been chosen for Perfection and has not, as she fears, absconded from the State. Mica feels bound by love and duty to seek Pearl — to save her from punishment if she is caught by the Ecumen or, worse, if she has left Civilisation.

Mica’s search will take her into a frightening physical and moral terrain where insurgents and outcasts are still fighting a strategic war against the clerical regime. But first Mica must bring herself to violate the secret–sacred space that is the Orchid Nursery.

Through its youthful protagonists The Orchid Nursery explores sexual politics and the co-opting of religion to perpetrate extremes of misogyny, violence, control and obliteration of the cultural and historical record. It also sees the possibility of hope emerging from the worst kind of dystopia. Continue reading