2016 Reviews completed!


excitedbaby

I’m finally caught up to 2017 reviews… and it’s only July!

In 2016, I read 50 books.

2016books

Of those 50, I only rated two books 5 stars. Happily they were both Australian women writers! Kings Rising by C.S. Pacat and The Orchid Nursery by Louise Katz.

The rest of the break down went like this:

  • I rated 16 of the books 4/5.
  • 23 of them 3/5.
  • 7 books got 2/5 stars.
  • I rated one book 1/5.
  • I couldn’t finish one book.

How did you go in 2016? Are you trying to challenge yourself with a reading challenge this year?

Stay tuned for my 2017 reviews coming soon.

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Review: Un-Conventional


Un-Conventional

ReviewStars-4

Synopsis: Two nerds at a sci-fi convention make a new friend…

Bookish Things: 8 pages. The cover is simple but eye catching in bright yellow.

Where to buy: Amazon on kindle for $0.97.

My Review: 

Bookshelves: awesome-authors, 4-star-review, aliens, indie-authorsci-fi, smirk-worthy

Recommended for: Sci-fi fans

Well this was a fun little tale. I thoroughly enjoyed the characters and even the backstory of a slightly strange sci-fi show with a small but loyal following of fans, even though I’m not a huge sci-fi fan myself.

This was amusing and very enjoyable. If you feel like trying one of Tony’s short stories I would recommend this one.

Review: Aurealis #78


aurealis78

3 stars

Read from December 19 to 23, 2016 — I own a copy , read count: 1

Synopsis: Now in its 25th year, Aurealis keeps up its tradition of bringing you the finest in Fantasy and Science Fiction. Issue #78 has the bracing neo-noir ‘Enfolded’, from J Michael Melican and the punchy ‘Discarded Pieces’ from David Coleman. Terry Wood brings us visions of the future in the first part of his History of the Flying Car, and, as always, Aurealis brings you the best in reviews. Aurealis, when only the best will do.

Bookish Things: I love this cover!

Where to buy: The Aurealis website or Smashwords for $2.99.

My Review: 

This edition of Aurealis sees the neo-noir ‘Enfolded’, from J Michael Melican and the punchy ‘Discarded Pieces’ from David Coleman making a splash.

I enjoyed both stories, but Enfolded was something extremely unique. I would have liked to learn more about the characters past, which was hinted at, and know what the future held for him. A truely interesting piece that outshone the other piece easily.

Having said that, though, both pieces are well written and formed part of a nice edition, including some advise for self-publishing and promotion as well as a handful of reviews on books.

I really liked the cover art of this edition.

Review: Queen of Arlin by T.C. Southwell


queenofarlin

2 stars

Read from February 15 to 28, 2016 — I own a copy

Synopsis:  When Queen Tassin is forced to flee her kingdom on the backwater planet of Omega V, she has no idea that the strange warrior who helps her is a cyborg; the deadliest hi-tech killing machine ever created. Her world has forgotten the technology that almost destroyed it, but then a freak accident damages the micro-supercomputer that controls Sabre, and he is free to take charge of his destiny…

Bookish Things: 214 pages. The cover is amateur but it does tie in with the story.

Where to buy: Amazon on kindle for Free or paperback for $15.00

My Review: 

Queen of Arlin should have been called: Annoying, whiny brat gets saved repeatedly by the cyborg.

Initially, I could understand Tassin’s predicament. She’s been left by her recently deceased father and must stand as Queen of Arlin, but she’s only young (16 or 17) and has few allies to lean upon. This becomes even more dire when the three king’s of the adjoining realms long to marry her and gain control of Arlin and all its land and wealth.

None of the three kings are suitable, and Tassin ends up having to flee her kingdom with a magical warrior (aka a cyborg) who has been charged with keeping her safe.

The adventure the two find themselves on, was quite interesting, the twists and turns that they were forced to take made for an intriguing tale. What really let it down for me was the sheer idiocy of Tassin. I hated her. Every time she opened her mouth I wanted to shake her. That the cyborg, Sabre, couldn’t harm her was the only reason this book wasn’t 50 pages long.

Sabre himself was initially a boring character. When things changed and he started to develop a personality, I began to enjoy the story more, but alas, his slight personality was no match for my hatred of all things Tassin.

I felt that Tassin’s petulance far outweighed even what the most stubborn of teens are capable of. It was gargantuan in proportion and as such has very firmly put me off picking up any of the next books.

A few things I noticed:
13% – …great explosion went go(delete go) off in…
16% – A(t) least she was safe…
35% – “I could.” And 15 lines below it are tabbed in.
There was another instance of this about 70-80% through.