Review: The Stone Gate


TheStoneGate

3 stars

Read from August 10 to 12, 2015

Synopsis: A strange rock in the forest. A mysterious crystal. A full moon. An ancient secret.
How do you find your way home when you’ve never left?

When Jack and Kaya see a dazzling white light shining from a giant rock in the forest, it takes them on an adventure to a place both familiar and yet like nowhere they know. But where exactly are they? And can they find their way back in time?

The Stone Gate is a young adult fantasy adventure that explores the issue of climate change in a unique and exciting way.

Bookish Things: 213 pages. The cover is quite intriguing and fits the story well.

Where to buy: Amazon on kindle for $0.70 or paperback for $16.95 or free on Smashwords.

My Review: 

The Stone Gate is very firmly set in the Young Adult adventure arena. It is, however also more than an exciting book for young adults. It is a look at Global Warming and what we, as a collective planet, are going to do about it.
For this reason, I have marked it down one star, because I felt that at times the constant discussion about what had been done to correct (or not) the path forward for humanity, came across a little like preaching. Now, this isn’t to say that the information and the message in this book is not valid. It is! But I would have preferred a little less ‘environmental preaching’ and more adventure. This is a personal preference thing, and I feel that young adults will probably not feel this way.

That little issue aside, I did enjoy the adventure that Kaya and Jack experienced. I think my favourite was Beth’s world, but I liked how the rich aboriginal history was brought into the story. For me, that really was a work of genius.

The pace of the book is spot on for younger readers, there is constant action and information being provided and it will keep those with shorter attention spans interested because of this. The tone is conversational and light with alternating POV chapters from Kaya and Jack. I liked this format because it allowed for a bit broarder a scope when trying to cover all the related topics as the kids went through their adventure.

This also posed some interesting challenges, in terms of how it was written. I didn’t really enjoy the first person present tense writing style, but I think I get where Mark was trying to go with it, alas I don’t think the choice lived up to its reputation. Using the first person present tense POV, should have given more insight into the characters (especially when they had interchanging chapters to voice their own personalities). Unfortunately, Kaya and Jack fell quite flat for me. Aside from having some pretty strong stereo-types, they didn’t seem all that developed.

Kaya was a nature, environmental guru. She watches shows like Bear Grylls and is in tune with nature. Where as Jack is a typical computer nerd-type of character. There is a couple of flashes of personality throughout the book, but it’s limited to specific events that the protagonists find themselves and don’t come through at other times.

All of that aside, I still enjoyed the book. It was a fast read and entertaining if you can look past the preaching about climate change.

I predict this should be suitable for ages 13 and up, however there are a couple of assaults/sexual references at the start that may cause distress to those sensitive to that type of thing.

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